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.josh

Member Since 31 Dec 1969
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 06:21 PM

Topics I've Started

National Read Across America Day - March 2nd, 2014

02 March 2014 - 06:07 PM

Otherwise known as  Dr Seuss Day. 
So in honor of this "holiday" and of Dr. Seuss:
 

 
You did not like green eggs and ham,
Sam, you did not give a damn

But then a bloke just wouldn't scram,
and now you like them plenty, Sam!

Now it's time to read a book -
don't you give that dirty look. 

You'll like reading Mr. Sam,
You will like it more than ham.

One book, two book, red book, blue book:
just pick and sit down in a nook.

You should read one in a house,
about a cookie and a mouse.

You will like it near and far,
even Where the Wild Things Are.

If evening is more opportune,
read in bed with Goodnight Moon.

Oh, the Places You Will Go,
imagine things that books can show.

If you don't believe it's so,
Ask the Doctor, Who should know.

"Doctor Who? Doctor Who?"
Just ask Horton, he hears too.

So read a book for that old cat; 
to Doctor Suess: I tip my hat.

DO NOT REPLY TO THREADS...

03 February 2014 - 10:42 AM

.. unless you are asking for clarification about the job.
 
Up until now, we have always made it to where people could not reply.  We decided to give it a try because people have constantly asked that we allow it, so that they could respond with clarifications, and we're willing to see how that goes.  But if all we see are people spamming their calling cards in the threads, we're going to issue a beat down and revert to no replying.  Do not make us regret this decision. 
 
Do NOT post your 'resume' or willingness to work etc.. in the job thread.  You must reply directly to the OP via email etc.  
 
IF YOU DO NOT FOLLOW THIS RULE,  BAD THINGS WILL HAPPEN:
  • You may get warned.  
  • You may get muted (mods must approve your posts before they are visible).  
  • You may be banned without warning.  
  • Ability to respond to the threads at all may be removed (for everybody).  
Action is at the sole discretion of moderators and admin.  Any one or more of these may happen, even on your first offense.


Update 2014.03.31

Welp, that didn't take long. I knew it would happen and sure enough, it did. This rule continues to be broken, even by people that we give warnings to instead of outright ban. So as of this date, you can no longer reply to threads in this forum (again). I apologize to the people who actually respected this rule, and I apologize to the OPs who can no longer even reply in their own threads to update info (there isn't an option to allow OP but not others), but you can thank the people who refuse to follow rules who instead think they will get somewhere by spamming their stupid calling cards on everybody's threads. I hate to be the guy that says "I told you so" but there you have it.

Freelance forum updates

02 February 2014 - 05:15 PM

We have made some updates to the Freelance forum. Previously it was just a forum in the Miscellaneous category, and there was no categorization of any kind. We have now broken it out into its own category, and have created separate forums for people looking to offer their services vs. offer work.

In addition to this, we have relaxed posting restrictions: we will now allow for people to reply to threads in those forums. This will make it easier for people to post updates in their own threads, as well as offer feedback/review of others. People have been asking for this forever, and we figured may as well give it a shot and see how it turns out. Do not make us regret this decision!

It is important to note that we have never and continue to not act as any kind of mediator or verification/compensation source for people/organizations who use those forums. We will not be held responsible/liable for any damages, loss, etc. that occur from use of those forums. If you hire someone and they rip you off, don't come crying to us. If someone hires you and they rip you off, don't come crying to us. Those forums are a convenience. If you want something more official that offers guarantees, go to a real freelance site!

.josh

RULES AND GUIDELINES

02 February 2014 - 04:58 PM

GENERAL RULES AND GUIDELINES FOR POSTING

This forum is not meant to be a formal freelance service system. 

 

It is available for those who wish to seek out services or work from other people, as a courtesy to the members of the phpfreaks community.  phpfreaks.com does not specialize in freelance services.  This forum is an informal mechanism, as a courtesy to the community.  We have no formal mechanism in place (like escrow) to guarantee payment, refund, work done, etc...

 

phpfreaks.com shall not be held responsible for any losses you incur.  we have never and continue to not act as any kind of mediator or verification/compensation source for people/organizations who use those forums. We will not be held responsible/liable for any damages, loss, etc. that occur from use of those forums. If you hire someone and they rip you off, don't come crying to us. If someone hires you and they rip you off, don't come crying to us. Those forums are a convenience. If you want something more official that offers guarantees, go to a real freelance site!

 

If you have any questions regarding the freelance forum, feel free to ask them here.

RULES:

  • WHERE TO POST:
  • If you want to offer a job or position of employment, post in the Job Offerings sub-forum.
  • People looking for work: DO NOT post your 'resume' in job posting threads. You must directly contact the person you wish to reply to. The only reason replies are allowed is to ask for clarification/details about the job. Failure to adhere to this rule will result in all kinds of things, like you getting banned, or us disallowing replies. 
  • People offering work: DO NOT make more than one thread for a specific job.  You may make a new thread if it's a different job, but if you are just wanting to tweak the job specifications, edit/reply to your original post.
     

 

GUIDELINES:

 

  • When posting in the freelancing forum it's important that you provide a way for users to contact you. They will not be able to reply to your topics so they need a way to contact you privately. This can be using PMs, emails, any type of instant messaging service (MSN, Gtalk, AIM, Jabber, etc.) or however you see fit.
  • Unless you're an experienced coder and are looking for an extra set of hands, don't assume the job you want done is something "quick" or "easy" or "shouldn't take too long" etc... maybe it is, maybe it isn't. That's like going to a mechanic and telling him you expect him to be done in 2 hours when you have no idea how to fix a car.  The best way to get a feel for how long something should take, is to get multiple quotes

 

  • Don't expect to get a response from coders if you're offering like $20 for someone to build you xyz site.  Do some research and find out what the going rate for sites, particular aspects of sites, scripts, hourly rates, etc.. whatever fits your needs.  You may indeed find people willing to do something super cheap, but as with everything else in life, you get what you pay for. The moral of the story is this: Just because one person quotes $20 to build xyz.com from the ground up, or charges $2.15/hr, doesn't mean everybody else is way overcharging. You get what you pay for.
  • Don't expect feedback from posting "You'll get x% of profits once income starts pouring in" deals.  Use some common sense: if the coder has to wait until you start making money off his work, what does he need you for? You get what you pay for.
  • Don't expect feedback from posting jobs as 'non-paid' or 'for free'.  Would you expect someone to build you a house or fix your car for free?  You might get lucky and find some altruistic coder, but more than likely, you won't. You get what you pay for.
  • Even if you do get responses from posts like the above ones mentioned, more than likely the quality is going to be cheap.  Cheap as in not a good deal, messy and poor coding, lack of communication, shady dealings, etc.. You get what you pay for.
  • Make sure you know what you want, before looking for someone.  Don't assume any part of your project or need, no matter how big or small, goes without saying.  Because it doesn't.  And I guarantee you you'll end up fighting with the coder about it.
  • Though details vary from coder to coder, yes, it is normal to have to pay some kind of % up front for work you want done.  It may sometimes be hard, but it is possible to recover or minimize monetary losses, should a deal go awry. It is not possible to recover work done. That is why the burden of payment is on the client.  There are lots of sites/systems you can go through to protect yourself from potential fallouts.  
  • One thing you can do is search through the user's posts here.  Just click on their name and at the bottom of their profile click the "show last posts of this person" link.  This can be a useful research tool for getting a feel for the person's skill level.  For instance, if you see their post claiming to have 10 years of php experience doing everything under the sun, but check their post history and see that they recently asked a bunch of really simple questions, chances are they are lying about their skills.

Javascript FAQ

11 November 2013 - 09:06 PM

Basically whenever I see a "Can javascript do this.." or "I'm trying to do this, and my syntax seems right, but it's not working.." questions, it almost always has to do with violation of some security/privacy policy. So that is the overall theme you're basically going to see here.

This is mostly a top-level "What you can and can't do with javascript" list. While I have provided some details for answering "why", or for pointing you in the right direction for a next-step on "how", this list isn't meant to be a comprehensive tutorial to fully explain the why's and hows of limitations and how to get around them, etc.. It's simply an entry point for figuring out a next step.


Here is a list of common questions about javascript that I've seen come up a lot over the years

Q: Can I execute php (or other server-side) code with javascript?
A: No. Not directly. But you can setup a server-side "controller" script to accept requests with info and do things based on that info. Read up on AJAX

Q: Can I use javascript to interact with my database?
A: No. Not directly. See above.

Q: I'm trying to use AJAX to request a script and it won't work
A: 9/10 times this is because you are attempting to request something on a domain other than what the script is running on. You cannot do this, as it is a violation of the Same Domain Origin Policy. Otherwise known as Cross-Site Scripting (XSS). It is possible for a server to be setup to allow for it, but by default servers are not setup for this and 99.99% of servers do NOT allow this. And even then, the browser my still reject it, depending on the security/privacy settings set in the browser. One trick to get around this is to output a regular javascript tag (you can even make one with js and append it to the DOM). There are limitations to this, but it may be enough, depending on what you are actually trying to accomplish. If it is on the same domain and it's not working, then post your issue.

Q: I'm trying to get or change the contents of an iframe and it's not working
A: 9/10 times this is because you are attempting to access iframe contents hosted on a domain other than what the script is running on. You cannot do this, as it is a violation of the Same Domain Origin Policy. Otherwise known as Cross-Site Scripting (XSS). Also the same restrictions apply for javascript running on an iframed page whose parent is not of the same domain.

Q: I'm trying to use javascript to read/write a cookie and it's not working
A: 9/10 times this is because you are attempting to access a cookie for a domain other than what the script is running on. You cannot do this, as it is a violation of the Same Domain Origin Policy. Otherwise known as Cross-Site Scripting (XSS). Cookies set on the same root domain, but with different subdomains also fall under this restriction. For example, if you set a cookie on "foo.yoursite.com" and then try to read it on "bar.yoursite.com" you will get an error. However, you CAN set your cookie to just be the root ".yoursite.com" domain and then both subdomains can access the cookie.

Q: Is javascript a form of java?
A: No. They happen to share the same name because someone thought it would be cute to confuse everybody.

Q: Can I use javascript to execute programs or read/write to files on someone's computer?
A: The shorter and technically accurate answer is yes - if you count cookies and local storage. Cookies and local storage are files on the user's computer, but they are heavily isolated. The longer answer to the question you're really asking is, no, not directly. Javascript can invoke certain other things such as an ActiveX or Java applet, and those scripts can do this sort of thing. However, default browser settings are set to either prompt the user to allow them to be run (along with a very strongly worded warning), or outright prevent it. So even if you get the user to run the ActiveX or Java applet, those are the things that can access it, not javascript itself.

Q: Can I use javascript to disable or change certain browser features like print, email, rightclicking, browser history, etc.?
A: Short answer is no. Javascript has very limited (and usually no) access to "browser level" stuff. Basically, if you are asking this question then you are almost certainly trying to do something you can't do.
Common examples:
- Printing/Emailing: You can invoke the browser's print function, which will in turn invoke whatever the user has setup to happen when they would normally print, but you cannot see or control what actually happens, what program is invoked, etc. same thing with emailing, etc..
- Browser History: You can use javascript to for example simulate a forward or backward click on the browser history but you can't actually read the urls in the history or alter them.
- Disabling Rightclick: Javascript does have limited ability to disable rightclicking, but it's not reliable across browsers, and if nothing else, the user can just disable javascript.
- Exiting the site: Javascript does have limited ability to prevent a user from navigating away from the page. For example, you can write javascript to stop links from working as intended, or you can write code to initiate a popup (the infamous "are you sure you want to leave?" popup), etc. but this doesn't work across all browsers, and newer browser versions will even ask the user if they want to prevent the javascript from doing it. And there is nothing you can do to prevent a user from simply closing their browser. Also, it's incredibly rude to try and trap a user on your site, and is a really good way to ensure they will never return and also tell everybody they know to avoid your site!
- Accessing browser bookmarks/favorites: javascript cannot read bookmarks (as in, the user's bookmarks) at all. Some browsers/versions do allow you to invoke the bookmark/favorite dialog (equivalent of ctrl+d shortcut), but this isn't the same as directly adding a bookmark, and some browsers do not even support this much.
- Disabling javascript: You cannot force the browser to run javascript. If a user disables it, it is disabled, end of story.


Q: Can I use javascript to validate my form values?
A: Yes! But do not rely on this! It is perfectly acceptable to do some pre-validation to cut down on wasted requests to your server but you should never rely solely on javascript for form validation. It is ridiculously easy to bypass it. But also, javascript can't directly validate stuff that you would need to lookup in a file or database (e.g. correct username/password).

Q: Can I use javascript to control the keyboard, mouse, webcam, etc.?
A: No. You can use javascript to detect when (most) keyboard keys or mouse buttons are pressed, or current x,y coords when a mouse is moved, but only when the page the javascript is running on has focus. You cannot simulate an actual key press or button click, though you can do things like auto-pop form fields with values or invoke the click event on a form button or link. IOW you can change the state of something on your page with javascript, but you can't use javascript to act as if a user had actually pressed a button or moved the mouse. For example, you can't make the mouse curser move to another position, or you can't invoke an alt+tab or ctrl+alt+delete sequence. As far as webcams, there is no javascript interface; you can't use javascript to activate a webcam, record, receive data from it, can't even detect if it's there, etc.

Q: Can I use javascript to prevent people copying my html/javascript/images?
A: No. You can obfuscate your code ("security through obscurity") but this is not the same as preventing theft.

Q: Can I use javascript to read request/response http headers?
A: No. Many addons (e.g. firebug, httpfox, web developer) can do this because their code is within a higher scope than javascript. An addon is essentially extending the actual browser (which is why they are also known as browser extensions).

Q: Can I use javascript to detect what plugins/add-ons/extensions the user's browser has?
A: The short answer is no, not reliably. Firstly, take some time to read up on what the difference between a plugin, add-on and extension is. Different browsers use these terms differently. But in general, the short answer is that there is no reliable way to get a list from any browser for any of those, though it's more or less reliable to detect one if you specifically look for it, in pretty much any browser except Internet Explorer.

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