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HGeneAnthony

Opinions on Kohana

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I've been looking into frameworks lately and I stumbled upon CodeIgniter and the subsequently Kohana.  There are some things I like about the concepts but I was wondering how good they are?  They have some nice features but I'm not huge on how arguments are passed, etc.  Has anyone used them here and what opinions do you have on them if you have?  Also FYI I would recommend checking out the Zend Framework.  It has some very nice features and I think it's a tremendous framework.

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CodeIgniter is simple and powerful framework... If you don't need monstrosities like ZF or don't like automation of Symfony, you will be probably satisfied.

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I do like some of the features Zend offers like it's port of Lucene search.  I don't know if Code Igniter offers a full text search but this is a port of the Java version and offers some great search criteria options beyond what you could get with Google and such.  I do like though that Zend seems to be an extension of what you are already doing, hence you can import it and get its functions even in projects you started years ago.  Code Igniter and Kohana seem to require you to build your app around their system from the start.  I have heard though Code Igniter is definitely the fastest framework.

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Yes, it is. If you're sure you NEED ZF features, then go for it. There's no reason why you should go for 'less capable' framework.

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I'm not trying to say anything bad about the others.  Zend is just the first one I discovered and I tended to like some of their tools.  It seems by reviews though a lot of people are fans of Code Igniter.  By the way I heard these frameworks were meant to be PHP versions of Ruby on Rails (which I've been hearing a lot about).  Do you know how similar they are?

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I'm not trying to say anything bad about the others.  Zend is just the first one I discovered and I tended to like some of their tools.  It seems by reviews though a lot of people are fans of Code Igniter.  By the way I heard these frameworks were meant to be PHP versions of Ruby on Rails (which I've been hearing a lot about).  Do you know how similar they are?

 

Codeigniter is much faster than Zend (which is why I dropped it) but you still don't have to give up Zend. Just use CI for the core and you can load Zend classes and work with the Zend stuff.

 

Actually, I just wrote my own 5 file MVC loader/core that I can just plug Zend and CI into with out needing either of there long bloated core files and startup classes.

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Zend Framework doesn't have 'core classes'. By 'startup classes' you mean the Controller package?

 

And what exactly did you do? Let's share more than just that. As it stands, nobody gets anything out of that info.

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Biggest problem with Kohana right now is that the development for it is very shaky

 

Versions have, so far, not been backwards compatible with one another. Current discussion is taking place on another change that will, once more, completely break older versions and require a revisit to the code to fix it and update the Kohana core.

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By the way I heard these frameworks were meant to be PHP versions of Ruby on Rails (which I've been hearing a lot about).  Do you know how similar they are?

I don't know where you heard that, but CodeIgniter is definitely not trying to be a PHP port of Rails. It is very different, and has a different ideology. CakePHP is probably the  one that copies Rails more, and PHP on Trax is actually trying to port Rails to PHP.

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Zend Framework doesn't have 'core classes'. By 'startup classes' you mean the Controller package?

 

And what exactly did you do? Let's share more than just that. As it stands, nobody gets anything out of that info.

 

Very true, options are worthless without data to support them.

 

http://phpimpact.files.wordpress.com/2008/07/zend-blog-db-hor.gif

 

Sorry to be rude, but.. And? That has very little to do with anything.

 

I asked for more info on this statement:

 

Actually, I just wrote my own 5 file MVC loader/core that I can just plug Zend and CI into with out needing either of there long bloated core files and startup classes.

 

MVC loader? Long bloated core files? Startup classes? Fictional, untrue, and non-existent respectively. An 'MVC loader' means exactly nothing, ZF doesn't have really have 'core files' and none of its classes can in all fairness be considered bloated. 'Startup classes' are non-existent in ZF: how you want to initialize your application is completely for yourself to define, like it should be any application framework.

 

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The link I posted was a diagram showing the CORE CLASSES that Zend loads when you use it as your "MVC Loader" (some call it "bootstrapping").

Without these classes you cannot start up a Zend install. The same with any framework.

 

Without loading these classes you cannot use routing, modules, views, or classes they are the core of zend.

 

All I was saying was that Zend wastes a lot of time loading many files just to get started - wordpress has the same problem (only worse).

Now this is fine if you are running enough server power to handle it - but smaller sites on shared hosts can tremendously cut the load with a smaller core loader setup.

 

Then you can just call Zend libraries as you need them without also running the startup core.

I'm not attacking Zend - It's just a fact of life. The more powerful an app - the more power it takes to run it.  ;)

 

Know your audience as one solution doesn't fix all problems.

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