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johnnyk

mktime vs. gmmktime

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I don't understand why this happens:

[code]
$date = getdate(mktime(0, 0, 0, 5, 27, 2006));
echo $date['weekday']; //Saturday (correct)
[/code]

[code]
$date = getdate(gmmktime(0, 0, 0, 5, 27, 2006));
echo $date['weekday']; //Friday (incorrect)
[/code]

What makes mktime() and gmmktime() different? I know gmmktime() is based on GMT time, but I don't understand why that makes a difference since the user is providing the date and time. Maybe I don't make sense. Let me know.

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Is it maybe the time zone differences? If you're ahead of GMT, maybe it is showing a different day because of that...

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Actually if it generates a timestamp there is no difference.

Basically mktime() generates local timestamps, and gmmktime() GMT timestamps.

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[!--quoteo(post=377741:date=May 27 2006, 10:20 PM:name=poirot)--][div class=\'quotetop\']QUOTE(poirot @ May 27 2006, 10:20 PM) [snapback]377741[/snapback][/div][div class=\'quotemain\'][!--quotec--]
Actually if it generates a timestamp there is no difference.

Basically mktime() generates local timestamps, and gmmktime() GMT timestamps.
[/quote]
Ah I see, I see. I didn't really understand what a unix timestamp was. It all makes sense now. But why 1970?

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Well, it's the beginning of the UNIX epoch. (January 1 1970 00:00:00 GMT). UNIX Timestamps represents the number of seconds between the time specified and the beginning.

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