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gluc0se

General (n00b) server questions

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Hey..I have been toying with the idea of buying a server and setting it up in my room, so I don\'t hafta deal with other people hosting my stuff, and their limits, etc...

 

But, I don\'t know the specifics of it exactly, and I would like to figure them out, hopefully with your help.

 

First off, the server itself, I obviously don\'t need huge amounts of space, but I don\'t know what is good, and what isn\'t. I was thinking of getting the Dell PowerEdge 400/600sc, it\'s cheap, and I am not sure why I would need more. What do y\'all think of it? Any better suggestions?

 

A big question now I have is if the DSL connection would hold up with it. I have a friend who has been running a mmorpg with abt 15-20 ppl on at once, lag-free of his computer, so I am thinking just hosting websites may work from my DSL. Anyone think differently?

 

I have abt 100 more questison, but I dont wanna get too long, so that should be ok for now..

 

Thanks so much :)

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i can only speak of my experience:

 

i run red hat linux 8 (i think) on a 450 dell with memory maxed out to the upper 700s on a cable connection. this box runs mysql, apache, php, and an occasional gaming server.

 

i have had no problems at all. the largest bandwidth consuming web application i run is one i made for sharing (legal) mp3s with friends, which, if they download 3 or more at a time, the kbs per sec drop into the teens.

 

i used DSL before i moved and it worked well. the connections depend on your location from their main hub, how many users, etc. you will need to carry out some local research on this one.

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Network type, and traffic are the keys.

 

If you don\'t expect gigabyte traffic, you could host fifty domains with Apache on FreeBSD or Linux (I\'d actually recommend *BSD) on a Pentium 133 from the dumpster with no performance hit for the most part.

 

Be sure and check your ISP\'s AUP.

 

Also, unless you have a static IP addy, you\'ll have to deal with dynamic DNS, which is a bit more headache than you might want. But you could definitely look into it.

 

I luv being the SU!! woot!!!

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Ok, well let\'s say I have 10 websites, 3 getting decent amounts of traffic, nothing huge, just some images and text, clocked at abt 160kbs upstream (boo), the other 7 getting just irregular visits. Would there be much of a slow down?

 

I ask because I plan to host some sites I make for others and I would want atleast a decent data rate...

 

That leaves me with another question...What are major differences to the different OSs? I have used linux on occasion and never BSD...What are advantages/disadvantages (I know this can get to be a heated discussion :P)

 

I believe that my DSL is a static IP... :)

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Oh, well..................

 

For starters, Linux isn\'t an OS. Red Hat Linux is; so is Mandrake Linux, Slackware Linux, Debian Linux, Gentoo Linux, SUSE Linux, Chainsaw Linux, etc., etc., etc.

 

Each of the Linuxes is some version or another of Linus Torvalds\' kernel (generally the latest at the time of release) with a \'userland\' made up of (mostly GNU) software and generally, a pre-installed/configured desktop environment, such as Gnome or KDE. A major goal of several of the Linux distros has been to \"compete with MS Windows\", and as a result, you get varying degrees of \"user friendliness\" and lots of graphical tools. The amount of \"free software\" for use with Linux blows the mind, and it doesn\'t blow your budget. Many people have heard of Linux; many have tried it, and their mascot is cuter.

 

The BSD\'s are directly descended from 4.4BSDLite, (one of?) the last release(s) from the (Univ. of California) Berkeley Systems Distribution. There\'s a lot more history and tradition in *BSD, and Linux users occasionally find it to be stiff and archaic, unforgiving at times, and more difficult to come to grips with in terms of terminology, etc. However, since it is rather tightly controlled by one group (actually now, 3 biggies, FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD) you have a more centralized distribution and documentation system, and a more centralized user community. The hier(7) layout is the same in all the BSD\'s (can\'t say that for every Linux distro, I don\'t *think* --- haven\'t used \'em all). The ease of upgrading the entire kernel && userland and the straightforwardness of the *BSD \'ports\' system is something that definitely makes these OS\'s worth investigating.

 

Slackware is perhaps the most BSD-like Linux, or was at one time. Gentoo has also imported the \"ports tree\" concept from the BSD\'s into its \"portage\" system.

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Confusing >.< but interesting...certain \"sheds some light\" on things...much light.

 

Which would you most recommend for fairly capable 16 yr old wishing to learn? :P

 

I guess the finaly test will be my own, trying diff. ones out..But do you have your own recommendation?

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Hmm, did I do that well??? I tried to not appear to have a preference...but if you read my first post in this thread, I did make a recommendation.

 

FreeBSD all the way for me ... good enough for Yahoo, good enough for my company. Be sure and dload the handbook before you destroy any HDD\'s .... :wink:

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destroy any HDD\'s

 

Bad. :-P

 

lol, I\'ll be sure to... Thanks a lot for ALL your help man, I really appreciate it...Expect more questions later heheh :)

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