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dptr1988

Assembly language

Do you know how to progam in Assembly language?  

70 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you know how to progam in Assembly language?

    • Yes
      22
    • No
      37
    • What is it?
      11


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I am wondering how many people working with web development also know assembly language.

How many years of assembly language?
Do you still use assembly language?
How long ago was you last project coded in 100% assembly?

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I think most web programmers are use to high-level languages such as PHP, and assembly is one of the most low-level languages Ive ever known, next to binary. So no, I dont know assembly.

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i know maybe 0.00001% of assembly....actually i can barely remember any...but i was fascinated by it in school but could never really do anything in it...just read a bit of it here and there

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i've read up [i]about[/i] assembly, but that's far from knowing it. i had to come up with some very simplistic assembly commands in my C++ course, but that was just for background, and i doubt i could even come up with any now :P

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I "know" a few different variations of Assembly, my latest project using Intel 8085 Assembly.  I used mainly Motorola processors in college.

At my old job (left a month ago), they were still using and I was still modifying an app that was completely in Assembly.  I hated it.  I tried my best to ignore change requests to that platform since it was being phased out anyways.

I don't currently use it for anything.

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If "Assembly language" is C/C+/C++ then yes, I do knowa small amount of Assembly language =]

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C/C++ are not assembly languages and C+ doesnt exist ;)

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I do not know what Assembly is.

My PHP experience goes for like, +2 weeks.
HTML experience goes for like, +1 year.
My CSS experience goes for like, +3 months.
My MySQL experience goes for like, +0 seconds.

Is Assembly worth learning? Or should I just learn the above?

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Assembly language is real programming. Most of the stuff with web development can hardly be called programming. So learning assembly language probably would not be much of a benefit for web development.

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plus assembly is really low level and nowadays, most languages are high level.

you wouldn't gain much by learning assembly unless your applications had to interact at a low level.

also, i don't really think you can call PHP a programming language as yet. it's more like a scripting language but on the server side.

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A very long time ago, I used the Big Mac Assembler for all sorts of 6502 code ... but those machines went to the dump many, many, years ago.

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Assembly language? You mean like Z80, 68000, SH2, 80x86, ARM7TDMI?

Nah, don't know it!

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[quote author=king arthur link=topic=101004.msg401827#msg401827 date=1153608014]
Assembly language? You mean like Z80, 68000, SH2, 80x86, ARM7TDMI?

Nah, don't know it!
[/quote]

Sounds like you're pretty well versed in assembly! :D

I've thought about learning assembly, but I've never had a need to go that low level, nor do I foresee a need. I don't currently know it, and don't plan on learning it. :)

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i was taught assembly in school about 13 years or so ago, along with learning c, because back then, c was a lot lower level than it is now, so it was common to intermingle assembly with c.  but i've never really touched it since then. 

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It's been a while since I did anything in 'Assembly'. The only reason I see to use it is when you really need to optimise something or take complete control over the system. These days, it seems a little unnecessary when languages like C++ do a pretty strong job of optimising code.
The only thing I ever used it for really was for graphics routines for games, where it was pretty essential to get things as fast as possible. I'd probably say that game development would be the only valid reason to learn/use it nowadays.

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I first started the asssembler language in 1970 with the IBM host systems. You had to do assembler then because the machines only had 128K (yes: Kilobytes) of storage (real, virtual did not exist).

Then with the 650x chips, like Commodore, you also had to use assembler because max storage was 64K and something like Basic (early Microsoft not yet Bill Gates) took 32K storage for the interpreter only.

Even with the PC in 1981 max storage was 64K-128K, so for a real program you had to do assembler.

Nowadays you have so much storage and so many different chips that it is not worth the effort to learn it. Unless you are a real freak and want to learn how a chip really works.

Ronald  :cool:

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i know a very very bit of assembly , and i plan to be good in it but it think it will need very long time .

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[quote author=MaaSTaaR link=topic=101004.msg429758#msg429758 date=1157624596]
i know a very very bit of assembly , and i plan to be good in it but it think it will need very long time .
[/quote]
you're right about the long time. even once you've grasped the basic concepts, it can still be quite tricky - the biggest reason being the fact that it's not an easily readable language - so you have keywords like 'int' (interrupt) and 'mov' (move) instead of C or PHP which have more descriptive function names. if doing things byte by byte flicks your bean, then assembly is for you. i remember studying viruses when i was at college, most of which were purely written in assembly and tought me quite a bit about the hows and whys. Also the Wolfenstein and Doom source code was a good learning point for the hows and whys, although it was written in C with assembly used for GFX/lighting routines, etc.

essentially though, the bare bones of assembly is just setting and moving 'bytes' around in memory, adding, subtracting, etc and using the chip's internal procedures to act on it. things were easier then though, when it was just a case of using 'int' to switch a screen mode and using 'mov' to move a coloured pixel to somewhere on the screen. nowadays things are far more complex. if low level is what you're after, i'd still suggest C++ or similar higher level languages, as most (if not all) C++ compilers allow you to also put assembly directly into the code for when it's essential to optimise, but without having the headache of going 'right down' to system level.

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Reminds me of a demo program that I saw that was coded in Assembly.  It was 14k in size, ran for 30mins before looping and was one of the most impressive displays of computer graphics I have seen ever done!

It was crazy!!

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Does assembly have any bearing on Web related development (website, dynamic website construction)

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[quote author=Crayon Violent link=topic=101004.msg497626#msg497626 date=1168026883]
no.
[/quote]

That's one way to put it, I suppose. ;D

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Assembly is a very low-level "language" that's used for interacting with the hardware, even below the operating system's control. The most common application for assembly is in a computer's BIOS, for communicating with the various hardware devices in the system. Comparing assembly to other languages is less than "apples and oranges" - more like apples and rocks. (Crappy analogy, I know.)

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