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khan kaka

Displaying Date in format of d/m/y

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can any one tell me how i can format the date display.

 

 

i want to be able to display the date in format of day/month/year

not the mysql standard format.

 

 

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Format the date. Mmmm, I know where that is in the manual... (does anyone ever read the manual?)

 

Enjoy.

 

:)

 

 

 

date

(PHP 3, PHP 4 )

 

date -- Format a local time/date

Description

string date ( string format [, int timestamp])

 

 

Returns a string formatted according to the given format string using the given integer timestamp or the current local time if no timestamp is given. In otherwords, timestamp is optional and defaults to the value of time().

 

Note: The valid range of a timestamp is typically from Fri, 13 Dec 1901 20:45:54 GMT to Tue, 19 Jan 2038 03:14:07 GMT. (These are the dates that correspond to the minimum and maximum values for a 32-bit signed integer). On Windows this range is limited from 01-01-1970 to 19-01-2038.

 

Note: To generate a timestamp from a string representation of the date, you may be able to use strtotime(). Additionally, some databases have functions to convert their date formats into timestamps (such as MySQL's UNIX_TIMESTAMP function).

 

 

 

Table 1. The following characters are recognized in the format parameter string

 

format character Description Example returned values

a Lowercase Ante meridiem and Post meridiem am or pm

A Uppercase Ante meridiem and Post meridiem AM or PM

B Swatch Internet time 000 through 999

c ISO 8601 date (added in PHP 5) 2004-02-12T15:19:21+00:00

d Day of the month, 2 digits with leading zeros 01 to 31

D A textual representation of a day, three letters Mon through Sun

F A full textual representation of a month, such as January or March January through December

g 12-hour format of an hour without leading zeros 1 through 12

G 24-hour format of an hour without leading zeros 0 through 23

h 12-hour format of an hour with leading zeros 01 through 12

H 24-hour format of an hour with leading zeros 00 through 23

i Minutes with leading zeros 00 to 59

I (capital i) Whether or not the date is in daylights savings time 1 if Daylight Savings Time, 0 otherwise.

j Day of the month without leading zeros 1 to 31

l (lowercase 'L') A full textual representation of the day of the week Sunday through Saturday

L Whether it's a leap year 1 if it is a leap year, 0 otherwise.

m Numeric representation of a month, with leading zeros 01 through 12

M A short textual representation of a month, three letters Jan through Dec

n Numeric representation of a month, without leading zeros 1 through 12

O Difference to Greenwich time (GMT) in hours Example: +0200

r RFC 2822 formatted date Example: Thu, 21 Dec 2000 16:01:07 +0200

s Seconds, with leading zeros 00 through 59

S English ordinal suffix for the day of the month, 2 characters st, nd, rd or th. Works well with j

t Number of days in the given month 28 through 31

T Timezone setting of this machine Examples: EST, MDT ...

U Seconds since the Unix Epoch (January 1 1970 00:00:00 GMT) See also time()

w Numeric representation of the day of the week 0 (for Sunday) through 6 (for Saturday)

W ISO-8601 week number of year, weeks starting on Monday (added in PHP 4.1.0) Example: 42 (the 42nd week in the year)

Y A full numeric representation of a year, 4 digits Examples: 1999 or 2003

y A two digit representation of a year Examples: 99 or 03

z The day of the year (starting from 0) 0 through 365

Z Timezone offset in seconds. The offset for timezones west of UTC is always negative, and for those east of UTC is always positive. -43200 through 43200

 

 

Unrecognized characters in the format string will be printed as-is. The Z format will always return 0 when using gmdate().

 

Example 1. date() examples

 

<?php

// Prints something like: Wednesday

echo date("l");

 

// Prints something like: Wednesday 15th of January 2003 05:51:38 AM

echo date("l dS of F Y h:i:s A");

 

// Prints: July 1, 2000 is on a Saturday

echo "July 1, 2000 is on a " . date("l", mktime(0, 0, 0, 7, 1, 2000));

?>

 

 

 

You can prevent a recognized character in the format string from being expanded by escaping it with a preceding backslash. If the character with a backslash is already a special sequence, you may need to also escape the backslash. Example 2. Escaping characters in date()

 

<?php

// prints something like: Wednesday the 15th

echo date("l \\t\h\e jS");

?>

 

 

 

It is possible to use date() and mktime() together to find dates in the future or the past. Example 3. date() and mktime() example

 

<?php

$tomorrow = mktime(0, 0, 0, date("m") , date("d")+1, date("Y"));

$lastmonth = mktime(0, 0, 0, date("m")-1, date("d"), date("Y"));

$nextyear = mktime(0, 0, 0, date("m"), date("d"), date("Y")+1);

?>

 

 

 

Note: This can be more reliable than simply adding or subtracting the number of seconds in a day or month to a timestamp because of daylight savings time.

 

 

Some examples of date() formatting. Note that you should escape any other characters, as any which currently have a special meaning will produce undesirable results, and other characters may be assigned meaning in future PHP versions. When escaping, be sure to use single quotes to prevent characters like \n from becoming newlines. Example 4. date() Formatting

 

<?php

// Assuming today is: March 10th, 2001, 5:16:18 pm

 

$today = date("F j, Y, g:i a"); // March 10, 2001, 5:16 pm

$today = date("m.d.y"); // 03.10.01

$today = date("j, n, Y"); // 10, 3, 2001

$today = date("Ymd"); // 20010310

$today = date('h-i-s, j-m-y, it is w Day z '); // 05-16-17, 10-03-01, 1631 1618 6 Fripm01

$today = date('\i\t \i\s \t\h\e jS \d\a\y.'); // It is the 10th day.

$today = date("D M j G:i:s T Y"); // Sat Mar 10 15:16:08 MST 2001

$today = date('H:m:s \m \i\s\ \m\o\n\t\h'); // 17:03:17 m is month

$today = date("H:i:s"); // 17:16:17

?>

 

 

 

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hi thanks for your reply but still i cant work it out.

 

this is my record set how can i modify this code to disply date in format of day/month/year.

 

thanks for your help

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hi thanks for your reply but still i cant work it out.

 

this is my record set how can i modify this code to disply date in format of day/month/year.

 

<td class="tblborder-tl"><?php echo $row_Recordset1['date']; ?></td>

 

thanks for your help

i mean this is my record set .

 

<td class="tblborder-tl"><?php echo $row_Recordset1['date']; ?></td>

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$row_Recordset1['date'];

What did you put IN that record? When we know that, we can suggest how to process/re-format that information to output the date in the form you want. Show us an example of the information, or explain how 'date' was entered into your database.

 

It might have been better to put the data into the database originally in the format you want. The date() function in the manual explains how to convert to any date format you want.

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the date is enterd in the datebase through a text field.

 

and the input i type is 30/01/04 d/m/y

 

and when i insert the date with insert record command in dream weaver it changes the date .

 

is there any other way i can enter the date.

 

becsaue when i use function such as ()DATE or ()Now they enter the current date but i want to be able to insert Dates manually.

 

for example i want to be able to insert dates for a bill due date.

 

thanks for you helps in advance. :)

 

 

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when i insert the date with insert record command in dream weaver it changes the date

Then there's something wrong with your insert record statement or in how you retrieve the POSTed 'date' field.

 

If you enter it as text, simply add it to the database as text.

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ok dukeee i did work out how to display the date in format i wanted

 

d/m/y with this bit of code

 

<td><?php echo date('d/m/Y',strtotime($row_Recordset1['date'])); ?></td>

 

thanks very much for your help.

 

but when i enter the date in date field in table it changes it to mysql standard date.

 

if i enter 30/01/04 ( d/m/y ) it changes it to (01/06/2006) and i think the reason it changes it to above date is, becasue in mysql table deafult date field is

0000.00.00 (y/m/d)

 

if i enter my date in text field as mysql standard date 2004/01/30 instead of

( 30/01/04) it works fine.

 

but if i enter the date as in d/m/y it changes it.

 

any suggestoin how i can change my enterd date to mysql (0000/00/00) standard.

 

 

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in mysql table deafult date field is 0000.00.00 (y/m/d)

If you had defined the 'date' field as a text field instead, then whatever you entered would be exactly what you got back. Isn't that what you wanted to happen?

 

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well if i use text field instead date field, there will be a problem if i want to sort it by date .

 

i tried that first but when i try to sort by date it gets confusd.

 

i am sure there is very easy way around this problem but if only i knew how lol :rolleyes:

 

cheers

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Use the timestamp or date function

 

change the timestamp column from 14 characters to 8 and would receive:

<?php echo $row_Recordset1['date']; ?>

20040322

 

then simply add ---echo date('m j, Y',strtotime(

to the beginning and add two )) to the end and receive:

<?php echo date('m j, Y',strtotime($row_Recordset1['date'])); ?>

03 21, 2004

 

Then using the Time formats make some sense, you can add or change as you like:

<?php echo date('F jS, Y',strtotime($row_Recordset1['date'])); ?>

March 21st, 2004

 

<?php echo date('l, F jS, Y',strtotime($row_Recordset1['date'])); ?>

Sunday, March 21st, 2004

 

Not too bad.

 

Hope this helps :P

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ok - I think I know where you're coming from...

 

the date is entered via a form into the database in DATE format

 

you need the results on the page to display in a different format (i.e. not the SQL format)

 

=====================================

 

in the SQL query (Application)

 

SELECT *, DATE_FORMAT(date, '%d %b %y') AS fdate

FROM blah blah blah

etc

 

this changes the format of the date... %d %b %y can be formatted any way by using the variables quoted in the manual or the post above

 

then in the code on the page...

<?php echo $row_Recordset1['fdate']; ?>

 

hope that helps

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Thanks for your feed backs. it helped alot. i did work out how to display the dates in diffrent formats.

 

 

but i want to know how can i insert date from a form field like (01/12/04 )( d/m/y)

manualy.

 

i have data base where i have to enter due date for accounts and i want to be able to enter dates manualy a nd sort them by date.

 

thanks for your feedbacks.

 

cheers

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I ran into a similar problem recently, and it has to do with what data type your field is set to accept. If it is saved of a type date(), then it's going to be in mySQL's pre-defined format. So, what I did was....

 

Created a table with a field named DATE varchar(8).

 

//in my page

$date = date("m-d-y"); //gets the system date and puts it in a string "mm-dd-yy" rtfm

 

<input type="hidden" name="date1" value="<? echo $date;?>" maxlength="8">

//hidden form element which stores the date

 

When the form is submitted, have it insert that value into your DATE field. Read the manual on date() to see how to get the exact format you want. I recommend the one above because you can sort by date if you so desire. Anywhoo, I hope I understood the problem and helped.

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