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Is it "wrong" to piggyback off someone's wireless network?


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Poll: Is it "wrong" to piggyback off someone's wireless network? (77 member(s) have cast votes)

Is it "wrong" to piggyback off someone's wireless network?

  1. Yes (always) (16 votes [20.51%])

    Percentage of vote: 20.51%

  2. No (never) (22 votes [28.21%])

    Percentage of vote: 28.21%

  3. Not when it's intentionally left open. (35 votes [44.87%])

    Percentage of vote: 44.87%

  4. Not when it's an emergency. (5 votes [6.41%])

    Percentage of vote: 6.41%

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#21 redbullmarky

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Posted 23 April 2007 - 12:54 PM

sure - but am i right in thinking that if you can join someones wireless connection, that you become part of the local network just as if you're in the house? sure, passwords and what not can still get in the way of getting access to the files, but there are still things that it appears you can do when you're dealing with local as opposed to remote computers and there are still occasions when the individual computers aren't locked down at all.
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#22 tomfmason

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Posted 23 April 2007 - 01:10 PM

After reading this I tried to see if I could pick something up in my area and I guess most of my neighbors don't know anything about wireless security. I have a much better service then them so I wont be piggy backing off of them but it is good to know.. :P

Now as far as the poll goes I think that it is ok to piggy back. I don't really see anything wrong with it. For me, it is nothing like stealing a car or anything like that. I personally feel that as long as you are not doing anything malicious there is nothing wrong with it. For me it is like walking out my door and finding a 100 dollar bill. I know that it belongs to someone else but if I don't see them drop it I am going to keep it. Now people that sit in there cars outside someones house are up to no good and that is wrong.I don't see anything wrong with someone using an open connection for entertainment purposes.

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#23 Daniel0

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Posted 23 April 2007 - 03:33 PM

I don't see anything wrong with someone using an open connection for entertainment purposes.


It sort of depends on what kind of "entertainment" you are looking for...

#24 tomfmason

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Posted 23 April 2007 - 03:47 PM


It sort of depends on what kind of "entertainment" you are looking for...


LoL.. True. Yeah, I guess there is a big hole in that.. :P

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#25 redbullmarky

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Posted 23 April 2007 - 04:20 PM

...I guess there is a big hole in that.. :P


i guess THAT depends on what sort of "entertainment" you're looking for ;D ;D ;D
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I say old chap, that is rather amusing!

#26 roopurt18

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 06:28 PM

I think redbull has seen some of the same mpgs and avis I have.

As far as piggybacking, irregardless of what the piggybacker is doing, I don't really think it's wrong.  It's the responsibility of the network owner to set their stuff up correctly and just about every router contains instructions to do so.

I think one of the major downfalls of society is the lack of accountability.  If you leave your network open to the public and someone else uses it for illegal purposes, whether you like the idea or not, you're an accomplice.  Now if someone had taken steps to protect their network and someone broke into it, you're a victim and innocent bystander.
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#27 neylitalo

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Posted 28 April 2007 - 01:42 AM

I'm going to throw some fuel on the fire.

What about our responsibility as people to be honest and respect one another? You know it's not yours, and you know they wouldn't appreciate it - why do you have the right to use the service that they paid for? Why are you allowed to take advantage of someone who knows less about network security than you do? Sure, some people just don't care, but you forget - this is still relatively new technology, and people aren't very well educated as to the risks and security pitfalls. WEP is crackable, and I've heard of a way to obtain WPA keys although I've never tried it. Just because you're using faulty technology, that doesn't mean that people are licensed to take advantage of it. Microsoft Windows is one of the least secure operating systems ever. Hell, they just released a critical security patch for a hole in ANIMATED MOUSE CURSORS. The vast majority of the world uses Windows, and I think you'll agree that people shouldn't take advantage of it "just because they can."

The moral of the story: "They should know better" isn't a valid excuse.
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#28 Azu

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Posted 11 July 2007 - 10:13 AM

Is it "wrong" to piggyback off someone's wireless network? If so, in what sense?

Yes just like it is wrong to "piggyback" off of somebody's phone.

Hell it might even BE their phone for all that you know!

#29 neylitalo

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Posted 13 July 2007 - 04:37 AM

Just out of curiosity, how can you piggyback on someone's phone, and what would it accomplish? I'm not sure I understand what you mean.
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#30 LiamProductions

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Posted 14 July 2007 - 09:56 AM

Nope, but everyone has the choice of putting a password on there network  ;D like me and everyone else round my house  :'(

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#31 Azu

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Posted 16 July 2007 - 03:51 PM

Just out of curiosity, how can you piggyback on someone's phone, and what would it accomplish? I'm not sure I understand what you mean.

By hooking up your phone to your phone line, just like you hook up your wireless internet to their wireless internet to steal bandwidth.

#32 Azu

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Posted 18 July 2007 - 06:14 AM

Oops typo, and for some reason this forum can't even let me edit my post now.
Meant to write this;
By hooking up your phone to their phone line, just like you hook up your wireless internet to their wireless internet to steal their bandwidth.

#33 GingerRobot

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Posted 20 July 2007 - 08:46 PM

I'm going to throw some fuel on the fire.

What about our responsibility as people to be honest and respect one another? You know it's not yours, and you know they wouldn't appreciate it - why do you have the right to use the service that they paid for? Why are you allowed to take advantage of someone who knows less about network security than you do? Sure, some people just don't care, but you forget - this is still relatively new technology, and people aren't very well educated as to the risks and security pitfalls. WEP is crackable, and I've heard of a way to obtain WPA keys although I've never tried it. Just because you're using faulty technology, that doesn't mean that people are licensed to take advantage of it. Microsoft Windows is one of the least secure operating systems ever. Hell, they just released a critical security patch for a hole in ANIMATED MOUSE CURSORS. The vast majority of the world uses Windows, and I think you'll agree that people shouldn't take advantage of it "just because they can."

The moral of the story: "They should know better" isn't a valid excuse.


Corr, we're really getting a bit of a philosophical debate going on here now aren't we?

Might be a bit late to this thread, but thought id throw my opinion in.

As neylitalo says, just because you can use it doesn't mean you should use it. However, I think i most agree with those that says it depends on the situation. Permantly using someone else's wireless network is a world away from taking advantage of someone elses to fix your broken network. If you're not benefiting from it particularly(that is, you're still paying for yours anyway), and the person from whom you are piggybacking is not affected by it(which is most likely) then i would think there is no real moral issue.

#34 Azu

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Posted 24 July 2007 - 05:51 AM

Well, I hope you don't get caught :)
I know that if I caught someone trying to hack into my network and steal my internet, I would definitely press charges, and I'm sure most people would to.

If you think it's worth the risk of having legal action taken against you, and you have no morals, then by all means, go right ahead.

#35 neylitalo

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 04:33 AM

Well, I hope you don't get caught :)
I know that if I caught someone trying to hack into my network and steal my internet, I would definitely press charges, and I'm sure most people would to.


Just out of curiosity, how do you plan to translate a MAC address (which you may or may not be able to determine, depending on the quality of your AP) to a person to press charges against?

And I can honestly say that I'd just find a way to stop them, and call it good enough. You're going to have a pretty thin case against them, and it just wouldn't be worth the time and effort.
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#36 GingerRobot

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 06:07 AM

There have actually been a few cases(albeit very few and isolated) here in the UK of people successfully pressing charges against someone using their internet without permission.

#37 timmy2

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Posted 01 August 2007 - 08:41 PM

no  ;)

#38 neylitalo

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Posted 01 August 2007 - 08:51 PM

no  ;)


Contrary to popular belief, one-word responses aren't actually that helpful. Please take this into consideration the next time you feel the urge to hit four buttons and press "Post". Thanks.
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#39 Azu

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Posted 06 August 2007 - 05:28 AM

Well, I hope you don't get caught :)
I know that if I caught someone trying to hack into my network and steal my internet, I would definitely press charges, and I'm sure most people would to.


Just out of curiosity, how do you plan to translate a MAC address (which you may or may not be able to determine, depending on the quality of your AP) to a person to press charges against?

Dunno. I guess I'd leave that to the police/FBI/whatever.

#40 markjoe

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Posted 01 September 2007 - 08:43 AM

It's not the same as stealing someones car. The car cannot be in two places at once, a wireless network can. Applies to the phone line thing also.
I see nothing wrong with using an open network for typical, normal usage on occasion (which the network owner would never notice). I have seen quite a few networks left open on purpose, most are unknowingly open.
If somebody is watching their paid-for cable TV on the porch, is it ok to stand on the sidewalk and watch it?
The TV thing is not completely analogous, but it's closer than stealing their car or phone line.

Ah, crap I can't believe I got sucked into this ancient debate...




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