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dbrimlow

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About dbrimlow

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  1. dbrimlow

    Centre Div in Middle of Screen

    Actually, for the body font-size to be a relative element it needs to be either a percentage or a keyword (small, medium). Setting a fixed pixel font-size for the body will not work in IE6 for setting relative font-sizes (ems, percentage, keywords). If you set a fixed pixel body font-size, it will not be elastic in IE6 ... it will always stay 12px and will not resize if the browser font size is increased or decreased.
  2. dbrimlow

    Centre Div in Middle of Screen

    He doesn't need to specify position:relative. So long as he specifies a width smaller than the parent container, AND "margin:0 auto", the id will center.
  3. dbrimlow

    Centre Div in Middle of Screen

    If you don't set what the relational body font size is (MUST NOT BE PX BASED!!!), how can you control any relationally based declared sizing? Based on your body element, just what is "1em"??? You are not giving the relational font size - thereby allowing the browser to decide what the default should be. Always VERY dangerous to a layout to let the browser default decide how it should look;even worse in IE6 and Opera. At least give it a relative "keyword" font size of "small" which all browsers understand and roughly display close to @ 12px. Then at least you can base the em sizing on a known relation @12px. AND, if you are going to use em based width sizing, then it is best to also use percentage or em for right and left margin/padding - using px right and left margin/padding can cause trouble with liquid/elastic floated elements when relational fonts are involved. body { font-size: small; margin: 1.2em; padding: 0px; } And, a last note - if you are going to use XHTML 1.1 Strict, shouldn't you get into the habit of using lowercase naming conventions for your css? You don't have to, but it seems as if you may as well use HTML 4.01 Strict - which will let you even code markup in uppercase - if that makes you more comfortable.
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