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redarrow

please read this for your own php neads all changing soon

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Hi there all i was reading this site about php 6 and according to all the changes in php6 nearly every think is being thrown out or re codded.

for example the {} and [] are soon changing whale.


here the link for php 6 hope this helps.


http://www.php.net/~derick/meeting-notes.html



what i wont to know is it that all my books got to be bined or can i still use them cheers.

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Old books are still good, but major changes are coming and many of them will not even include backward compatibility, which I think is good thing, because I heard it discussed at many workshops as of late that there are so many functions that do very much the same thing, but because no unicode support was around, a copy cat function was made. So many functions are leaving like [b]ereg[/b], sure it still will be in PECL, but it will not be part of the core.

Which is good thing, because unicode support recommends moving to PCRE, because Perl has always been more unicode compliant, and much faster than any POSIX function. So like Wez and Derick have said, PHP 6 is the new way of doing things, I also like the fact that more C centered options / functions are being written in, like [b]goto[/b], it's no really need in PHP because PHP has enough control constructs already, but it does give the developer some more interesting options, regarding logical control.

All I can say, PHP 6, is all that was missing and what was promised in PHP 5, plus some extra stuff that will make development debugging really easy! Overall I think it's a very impressive statement by the PHP Team! But books are great, even old ones, for many of the older books explain things in a better way. I mean I am not putting new books down, but some of these authors really need some help in understanding that times change, so reinventing wheel sometimes needs to be done!


me!

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Are you part of the team or a friend anyway thank you.

Thank you for telling me all what it means on the page cheers mate.

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i've looked through these a few weeks back, and to be honest it doesnt appear like much will change thats gonna have any major impacts. many of the comments in those minutes make it very clear that they dont want to 'break' too much and most of PHP4 stuff will still be fully compatible.

if you're relying on half the stuff they're getting rid of (HTTP_POST_VARS, register_globals, etc) then you really need to be avoiding these anyway, turning them off, and making your code work without them, as all they've really contributed to PHP is security issues.

If PHP6 is as slow to take off as PHP5 has been (from a hosting point of view), then I really hope it makes people move up from 4 to 5 at least. I've only upgraded myself over the last few weeks and with all the new stuff there, it really surprises me why the uptake has been slow. But writing stuff on PHP5 (notably OO stuff) and trying to take care of people still on 4 is a nightmare.

@hostfreak: not unless you NEED to learn the extras. I like to think of things like this as "more available if I need it" rather than "more to learn". For example, using PHP5 instead of 4 is no different to use AT ALL, unless you're doing OOP.

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redbullmarky a quick quistion do see a reel speed inpact with php 5 not upgradded yet why i am asking cheers.

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tis a tricky one to answer as i honestly dont know. I tend to keep my scripts and sites all quite simple anyway, so even if there was a dramatic increase, it wouldnt be something i'd notice as a result. It's not slowed down, which is good enough for me, and from what I've read, the performance is miles better. But you'd probably only really notice it with something quite intensive.

TBH, I only upgraded mainly because of better support for OOP because it's something I'm getting to grips with and learning much more about.

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[quote author=hostfreak link=topic=110701.msg448061#msg448061 date=1160149558]
Great, more to learn.
[/quote]

this is a constant state in programming. if you ever get to the point where you believe you have learned all there is to learn about a language, it's probably time for you to quit programming ;)

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[quote author=redbullmarky link=topic=110701.msg448066#msg448066 date=1160150180]
i've looked through these a few weeks back, and to be honest it doesnt appear like much will change thats gonna have any major impacts. many of the comments in those minutes make it very clear that they dont want to 'break' too much and most of PHP4 stuff will still be fully compatible.

if you're relying on half the stuff they're getting rid of (HTTP_POST_VARS, register_globals, etc) then you really need to be avoiding these anyway, turning them off, and making your code work without them, as all they've really contributed to PHP is security issues.

If PHP6 is as slow to take off as PHP5 has been (from a hosting point of view), then I really hope it makes people move up from 4 to 5 at least. I've only upgraded myself over the last few weeks and with all the new stuff there, it really surprises me why the uptake has been slow. But writing stuff on PHP5 (notably OO stuff) and trying to take care of people still on 4 is a nightmare.

@hostfreak: not unless you NEED to learn the extras. I like to think of things like this as "more available if I need it" rather than "more to learn". For example, using PHP5 instead of 4 is no different to use AT ALL, unless you're doing OOP.
[/quote]

[b]redbullmarky[/b], I think your slow to take off, statement is very true, but PHP has never been marketed, and most host have a set  of bricked ISO distro(s), so I think the slowness has nothing to do with people just not upgrading, but because hosts and OS distributors don't upgrade. I know I did study using some personal resources over at Netcraft for a PC magazine 6 months ago and I found PHP 5 is used on more Windows servers than Linux servers, it was a big margin something like 3 to 1, but that is because Windows does not come with PHP installed, even 85% of the dedicated Windows Server based hosts I interviewed don't install PHP by default, so host and system administrators and personal users download these packages directly off the PHP site, if I remember it was some thing like 4 million plus PHP install packages downloaded last month alone.

Also like you said, there really isn't a need to upgrade, unless your trying out some new functionality, or you like helping make PHP better and do alot of bug testing. what ever the reason, PHP 6 is impressive, just for it unicode support, and believe me, it's very difficult to add cross system wide support, because of how each system does unicode differently!


me!

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