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Paul-D

Using # on Unix

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Posted (edited)

Hi this is not a PHP problem it is a unix/linux problem.I have been going through my banking website and found a folder /#/login

 

I have never seen # used as a folder. Can someone tell me if I can do this and what symbols are available.

Edited by Paul-D

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2 minutes ago, Paul-D said:

this is not a PHP problem

Then why post it in the PHP Help forum?

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6 minutes ago, Paul-D said:

I have never seen # used as a folder. Can someone tell me if I can do this and what symbols are available.

Don't do it. Whoever did it probably thought they were being clever, but now you come along and you have no idea what the significance of it is.

Name stuff appropriately.

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Posted (edited)

This looks totally mixed up

Quote

Hi this is not a PHP problem

right

Quote

it is a unix/linux problem

not really, this is just a guess from you

Quote

I have been going through my banking website

what "banking website"? As you don't seem to be firm with the technology, i would think it's not YOUR website, more like the website of the bank you are customer at.

and the website is accessed via URL - that has plain nothing to to with any "folder" as i think you mean from a filesystem - except that there's a common fallback.

Quote

and found a folder /#/login

And the syntax for a URL is documented:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/URL#Syntax

Edited by chhorn
  • Like 1

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Posted (edited)

If you're talking about just seeing /#/login in the URL, then the # isn't a folder name.  The # denote a fragment identifier.  The /login is likely then used by some Javascript on the page to determine what content to display.  This was commonly used for web applications prior to the advanced history API becoming available in modern browsers, and is still commonly used when you need to maintain high backwards compatibility which a bank likely does.

 

If you actually mean a file system folder with # as it's name, then it's a dumb idea and who knows why they did it.

Edited by kicken

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