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Poll: Do you know how to progam in Assembly language? (70 member(s) have cast votes)

Do you know how to progam in Assembly language?

  1. Yes (22 votes [31.43%])

    Percentage of vote: 31.43%

  2. No (37 votes [52.86%])

    Percentage of vote: 52.86%

  3. What is it? (11 votes [15.71%])

    Percentage of vote: 15.71%

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#21 Ninjakreborn

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 07:48 PM

Does assembly have any bearing on Web related development (website, dynamic website construction)

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#22 .josh

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 07:54 PM

no.
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#23 neylitalo

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 08:14 PM

no.


That's one way to put it, I suppose. ;D
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#24 Ninjakreborn

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 10:36 PM

To the point, but an answer nonetheless  Thanks.

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#25 neylitalo

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 11:12 PM

Assembly is a very low-level "language" that's used for interacting with the hardware, even below the operating system's control. The most common application for assembly is in a computer's BIOS, for communicating with the various hardware devices in the system. Comparing assembly to other languages is less than "apples and oranges" - more like apples and rocks. (Crappy analogy, I know.)
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#26 448191

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Posted 05 January 2007 - 11:18 PM

So NO.  ;D

#27 .josh

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Posted 06 January 2007 - 09:02 AM

Assembly is a very low-level "language" that's used for interacting with the hardware, even below the operating system's control. The most common application for assembly is in a computer's BIOS, for communicating with the various hardware devices in the system. Comparing assembly to other languages is less than "apples and oranges" - more like apples and rocks. (Crappy analogy, I know.)


I would say more like comparing apples to seeds. 
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#28 roopurt18

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Posted 03 March 2007 - 07:05 AM

I used it in college.. The two biggest assignments were to program a queue in assembly and another to run these boards built by students from the computer engineering department.  We used a simulator, spimsal, to simulate MIPS instructions if I remember correctly.  The latter half of the course we programmed in HC11 for motorola processors; I still have my three HC11 books on my bookshelf.

@redbullmarky, you are partially correct in your game development comment.  Most of what they do is in C or C++, but sometimes they have to take real control of the hardware.

The other field where you'd probably still see some assembly is in real time systems.  Programmers for all our handy devices like coffee pots, alarm clocks, microwaves, pagers, cell phones, navigation systems, modems, routers, etc. still probably use it here and there.
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#29 Balmung-San

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Posted 07 March 2007 - 05:08 PM

I've looked at it. Kind of gotten a feel for it, though I can't say I really know it yet. Assembly is one thing that I really want to look into, as I have an interested in OS development, and as far as I'm aware you'll need at least a small bit of assembly to get everything started up.
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#30 WebGeek182

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 12:15 AM

Just checking, but this is still a PHP forum, right? So we're talking about Assembly language......why?  (said with friendly sarcasm)

;)

#31 neylitalo

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 12:43 AM

The Polls area isn't specific to PHP... the board descriptions are pretty clear as to the subject matters permitted, take a look if you're ever in doubt.
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#32 roopurt18

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 04:46 AM

I'd hate to see what he has to say about the fruit poll.
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#33 fert

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Posted 13 June 2007 - 10:19 AM

I wish I could change my vote, because I recently learned assembly.

as I have an interested in OS development, and as far as I'm aware you'll need at least a small bit of assembly to get everything started up.

Actually, you need quite a bit of assembly, the GDT (global descriptor table) and the IDT (interrupt descriptor table) (they are very important) require big chunks of assembly and you'll need assembly for debugging, i.e. doing things like register and stack dumps.

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#34 Azu

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Posted 11 July 2007 - 10:40 AM

If "Assembly language" is C/C+/C++ then yes, I do knowa small amount of Assembly language =]

I'm pretty sure that C and all of it's variants are or originally were CREATED BY Assembly. And most high level languages like PHP are created from creations of Assembly.

#35 roopurt18

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Posted 19 July 2007 - 03:46 AM

I'm pretty sure that C and all of it's variants are or originally were CREATED BY Assembly. And most high level languages like PHP are created from creations of Assembly.


The original C compilers had to be written in assembly; but once a single C compiler exists then you can create future C compilers in C instead of assembly.

IIRC, the first Microsoft C compiler was written in Borland's C IDE.
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#36 neylitalo

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Posted 19 July 2007 - 04:23 PM

And most high level languages like PHP are created from creations of Assembly.


Technically that's true, although it would be more accurate to say that PHP is written in C.
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#37 Daniel0

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Posted 19 July 2007 - 06:16 PM

Maybe it's a stupid question, but how was the first assembly compiler then made? ???

#38 roopurt18

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Posted 19 July 2007 - 06:17 PM

Probably with binary punch cards.
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#39 Azu

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Posted 24 July 2007 - 05:56 AM

Maybe it's a stupid question, but how was the first assembly compiler then made? ???

Yep, binary.
Assembly is the lowest (fastest/smallest) programming language besides binary.
The downside is that it has a steeper learning curve; it's not as simple and easy as "higher" level languages.

#40 ociugi

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Posted 09 November 2007 - 02:07 AM

assembly language, you mean like this

  mov  ax,seg message
  mov  ds,ax

  mov  ah,09
  lea  dx,message
  int  21h

sorry, i dont know it. ;D
01101010 01100101 01100110 01100110




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