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  1. Barand

    Barand

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    requinix

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  3. Jacques1

    Jacques1

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  4. Psycho

    Psycho

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/21/2012 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    I have to agree - do a single query to get the events for the month. I would set up a calendar array of the days in the month (structure: $calendar[wk][wkday][events] ) Loop through the query results and drop the events into their respective week/day slots Loop throught the array to output the calendar DATA TABLE: event +----+----------+---------------------+ | id | name | date_time | +----+----------+---------------------+ | 1 | Event 1 | 2018-11-01 15:00:00 | | 2 | Event 2 | 2018-11-02 12:00:00 | | 3 | Event 3 | 2018-11-11 14:00:00 | | 4 | Event 4 | 2018-11-14 11:00:00 | | 5 | Event 5 | 2018-11-15 14:00:00 | | 6 | Event 6 | 2018-11-16 15:00:00 | | 7 | Event 7 | 2018-11-19 15:00:00 | | 8 | Event 8 | 2018-11-20 16:00:00 | | 9 | Event 9 | 2018-11-23 14:00:00 | | 10 | Event 10 | 2018-11-30 10:00:00 | | 11 | Event 3A | 2018-11-11 16:00:00 | +----+----------+---------------------+ CODE <?php include('db_inc.php'); $db = pdoConnect("test"); // connect to "test" database $curmonth = date('F Y'); // // set up the date range required // $dt1 = new DateTime("first day of this month"); $dt2 = clone $dt1; $dt2->add(new DateInterval('P1M')); $dint = new DateInterval('P1D'); $dper = new DatePeriod($dt1, $dint, $dt2); // // create an array calendar[wk][wkday][events] to store events then output // $calendar = []; foreach ($dper as $d) { $wk = $d->format("W"); $calendar[$wk] = array_fill_keys(range(0,6), []); } // // get the event data for current month // $stmt = $db->query("SELECT id , DATE_FORMAT(date_time, '%D') as day , WEEK(date_time, 1) as wkno , WEEKDAY(date_time) as wkday , DATE_FORMAT(date_time, '%k:%i') as time , name FROM event WHERE YEAR(date_time) = YEAR(CURDATE()) AND MONTH(date_time) = MONTH(CURDATE()) ORDER BY wkno, wkday, time "); // // loop through results and drop events into the array // foreach ($stmt as $ev) { $calendar[$ev['wkno']][$ev['wkday']][] = [ 'day' => $ev['day'], 'time' => $ev['time'], 'name' => $ev['name'] ]; } // // output the array // $tdata = ''; foreach ($calendar as $wk => $wdata) { $tdata .= '<tr>'; foreach ($wdata as $dno => $events) { $cls = $dno > 4 ? "class='we'":""; $tdata .= "<td $cls>"; foreach ($events as $ev) { $tdata .= "{$ev['day']} {$ev['time']} {$ev['name']}<br>"; } $tdata .= "</td>\n"; } $tdata .= "</tr>\n"; } ?> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"> <meta name="generator" content="PhpED 18.0 (Build 18044, 64bit)"> <meta name="creation-date" content="11/06/2018"> <title>Sample Calendar</title> <style> table { border-collapse: collapse; font-family: verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 10pt; } th { background-color: #369; color: white; padding: 5px; width: 14%; } th.we { background-color: #358; } td { background-color: #FFE; padding: 5px; } td.we { background-color: #FFC; } </style> </head> <body> <h3>Calendar <?=$curmonth?></h3> <table border='1'> <thead> <tr><th>Mon</th><th>Tue</th><th>Wed</th><th>Thu</th><th>Fri</th><th class='we'>Sat</th><th class='we'>Sun</th></tr> </thead> <tbody> <?=$tdata?> </tbody> </table> </body> </html> OUTPUT
  2. 3 points
    I can't imagine a scenario where the gobbledy-gook of a system you apparently are trying to create would be justified, or possible within your demonstrated engineering capabilities. You are talking about trying to create a system that requires a user to only use one workstation and browser to access your system. I don't know what your system would be doing, but it better be providing literally life saving services, because short of that, nobody is going to put up with the restrictions you have in mind. They are anti-user, and when you make things difficult for users, they stop using your system, or never even stay long enough to pass the entry point. It is damn difficult to get anyone to sign up to use legitimately valuable services, which is why you see so many systems that integrate with facebook, google and twitter, so that you can create your account and trust authentication from those systems to allow access. Furthermore some of your plans reflect an apparent lack of understanding of Internet basics like NAT. In your system, if we were to follow along with your plans, for a large company with perhaps 1000 employees at a particular site, you plan to only allow 1 employee there to use your system. Ditto universities, or even an average household: "Hey there roommate, I just made an account at this site, you should too!" "WTF, the system says I'm banned!" Since you are focused on investigating a client IP, I will say this about IP addresses -- they are reliable at least to the degree that they reflect the tcp socket connection from the client to the server. That information bubbles up to PHP from the IP layer, to the server, and finally to PHP's $_SERVER superglob. The problem is, that a client could have bounced through a variety of gateways, proxy servers or VPN prior to the point that you are finally connected. In many sophisticated hosting environments there are things like load balancers or reverse proxy servers that sit between the client connection and the server which interfere with $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']. Rather than see the client IP, you instead see the IP of the proxy server. If you have that sort of environment, then you can examine $_SERVER['X-Forwarded-For'] or $_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR'] variables. These may be arrays with a series of addresses. Again you have the issue that these are provided by the "client" so if it is a proxy server you can depend on at least the most recent address to have been the one that made the TCP socket connection to YOUR proxy server. Other legitimate proxy servers will provide the same data. However, someone who is taking steps to hide their origin is not going to be prevented from obscuring their IP and there is absolutely nothing you can do about it. Almost everyone uses NAT in some form, so the actual person IP address of a workstation on a network is never going to be visible (and would also be useless if it was, since these will be non-routable IP addresses that are shared by hundreds of millions of users). Solutions to the issue of certification and authentication, when people have real and legitimate reasons to solve them, involve cryptography. What you are trying to do can be accomplished using X.509 certificates which have support built into browsers. In a nutshell, at account creation time you would generate an client certificate for that user, installing that into your server, and then providing the signed cert back to them in a specific header (application/x-x509-user-cert ). This will cause the browser to prompt the user to install the cert into their browser. If they accept you know have a reliable way of identifying a specific user. At that point, whenever they connect (must be under SSL) you'll be able to authenticate them back to your system via that particular certificate. Those without a client certificate will be unable to connect. You can think of this as white listing. It is highly effective but is typically used only in environments where the system knows in advance who their allowed users are. Trying to use it in a public facing website with an unknown user base is something you just don't see because the benefits of trying to do this far outweigh the tolerance that people have for a system that has that degree of odious overhead and invasion of their privacy. In conclusion: The types of things you are obsessed with are all edge case items. No quality system begins with the premise that the #1 goal is to try and catch and outsmart an imaginary horde of people attacking your site for reasons unknown. This started as a specific thread about the contents of $_SERVER variables and then escalated into fairly delusional territory, with a dash of your personal Devshed drama thrown in. And let's just be clear about one thing: If you ever bring up your personal issues regarding your Devshed access again, which are irrelevant to this community, then your access to this community will end as well. It's off topic, it's a waste of people's time and efforts here, and it's rude. I just want to be clear that I won't tolerate it again.
  3. 2 points
    Use absolute URLs <link rel="shortcut icon" href="/images/favicon.ico.png"> <a href="/index"> <img src="/images/logo.PNG" alt="logo" /> I don't understand how so many people can be unaware of them.
  4. 2 points
    Use array_intersect(), arrays, and CSS and save yourself all that repetition <?php $arrays = [ 'A' => [2, 6, 8, 11, 14, 18, 24], 'B' => [1, 2, 9, 10, 13, 14, 25, 28], 'C' => [1, 3, 7, 9, 13, 15, 20, 21, 24], 'D' => [4, 5, 12, 22, 23, 27, 28, 29] ]; $input = '2,15,37,13,28'; $parts = explode(',', $input); ?> <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <title>Example</title> <style type='text/css'> table { border-collapse: collapse; } th, td { font-family: verdana,arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: 12px; } th { background-color: #DCDCDC; color: #000; text-align: left; padding: 4px; } td { padding: 4px; } </style> <body> <table border='1'> <?php foreach ($arrays as $gp => $a) { echo "<tr><th>GROUP $gp</th><td>" . join(', ', array_intersect($a, $parts) ) . "</td></tr>\n"; } ?> </table> </body> </html>
  5. 2 points
    Text areas do not have a value attribute. EG <textarea rows="10" cols="100" name="page_description" >Text area content goes here</textarea> The text content goes between the <textarea> and </textarea> tags. As you don't have the closing </textarea> it assumes everything following is still part of the text content.
  6. 2 points
    I've been wrestling with this logic puzzle for days... My website lists item prices as they are posted: First item: item# ABC1234 = Hammer $5.00 Visitor then submits (to the same page) more item numbers (e.g. item# DEF9999) and the displayed list will grow: item# ABC1234 = Hammer $5.00 item# DEF9999 = Crowbar $6.00 --------------------------------------- However, when website gets visited via Affiliate, I want PHP to launch a Session to "remember" the First Referred Item, along with the Affiliate: // http://www.example.com/salePrice.php?Affiliate=SomeExampleCompany&item=ABC1234 <?php if(isset($_GET["Affiliate"])) { session_start(); $_SESSION["Affiliate"] = sanitized($_REQUEST["Affiliate"]); $_SESSION["item"] = sanitized($_REQUEST["item"]); } ?> <body> <form action="salePrice.php" method="post"> etc. etc. etc. The problem: Session won't stay running if visitor subsequently posts more items to the same page. (I thought once a Session starts, the Session will run as long as you don't navigate away from the page.) Without having to put "session_start()" on the top of the page (and have Sessions running no matter what), what is the trick to get this to work?
  7. 2 points
    Added some extra lines to facilitate output (commented) <?php $results = []; $teamnames = []; // array to gather the unique team names foreach ($data as $yr => $ydata) { if (!isset($results[$yr])) { $results[$yr] = []; } foreach ($ydata as $tdata) { if (!isset($results[$yr][$tdata['team']])) { $results[$yr][$tdata['team']] = 0; } $results[$yr][$tdata['team']] += $tdata['value']; $teamnames[$tdata['team']] = 0; // put teamname in array as the key. } } $thead = "<tr><th>Year</th><th>" . join('</th><th>', array_keys($teamnames)) . "</th></tr>\n"; $tdata = ''; foreach ($results as $yr => $tresults) { $totals = $teamnames; // copy of the empty teamnames array foreach ($tresults as $tm => $tot) { $totals[$tm] = $tot; /// put the totals into the team column } $tdata .= "<tr><td>$yr</td><td>" . join('</td><td>', $totals) . "</td></tr>\n"; } ?> <html> <body> <table border='1' style='border-collapse:collapse'> <?=$thead?> <?=$tdata?> </table> </body> </html>
  8. 2 points
    As you are sorting on "name", which is the first element of the sub-arrays, you can just use an ordinay sort() or rsort() call. (By default it will sort on the values oof the first element) EG $tadminlist["pvp"] = [ [ 'name' => 'mapname1', 'type' => 'pvp', 'beta' => 'y', 'final' => 'n', 'modded' => '', 'classification' => 'land', 'sf' => 'n', 'tod' => 'dawn', 'weather' => 'fog', 'es2' => 'y' ], [ 'name' => 'mapname3', 'type' => 'pvp', 'beta' => 'yy', 'final' => 'n', 'modded' => 'y', 'classification' => 'air', 'sf' => 'y', 'tod' => 'day', 'weather' => 'rain', 'es2' => 'n' ], [ 'name' => 'mapname2', 'type' => 'pvp', 'beta' => 'n', 'final' => 'y', 'modded' => 'n', 'classification' => 'sea', 'sf' => 'n', 'tod' => 'night', 'weather' => 'clear', 'es2' => 'n' ], ]; echo "line = " . join(', ', array_keys($tadminlist["pvp"][0])) . '<br><br>'; listData($tadminlist["pvp"]); echo "<br>SORTED ASC<br>"; sort($tadminlist["pvp"]); listData($tadminlist["pvp"]); echo "<br>SORTED DESC<br>"; rsort($tadminlist["pvp"]); listData($tadminlist["pvp"]); function listData($arr) { foreach ($arr as $tlist) echo join(', ', $tlist) . '<br>'; } OUTPUTS line = name, type, beta, final, modded, classification, sf, tod, weather, es2 mapname1, pvp, y, n, , land, n, dawn, fog, y mapname3, pvp, yy, n, y, air, y, day, rain, n mapname2, pvp, n, y, n, sea, n, night, clear, n SORTED ASC mapname1, pvp, y, n, , land, n, dawn, fog, y mapname2, pvp, n, y, n, sea, n, night, clear, n mapname3, pvp, yy, n, y, air, y, day, rain, n SORTED DESC mapname3, pvp, yy, n, y, air, y, day, rain, n mapname2, pvp, n, y, n, sea, n, night, clear, n mapname1, pvp, y, n, , land, n, dawn, fog, y To sort by any other element would require usort, eg to sort by classification usort($tadminlist["pvp"], function($a, $b) { return $a['classification'] <=> $b['classification']; } );
  9. 2 points
    I'd go a step further and give all the checkboxes the same name EG name='problem[]' so they are posted as an array <label><input type="checkbox" name="problem[]" value="Hard Drive Crashed"> Hard Drive Crashed</label><br> <label><input type="checkbox" name="problem[]" value="Has Virus"> Has Virus</label><br> <label><input type="checkbox" name="problem[]" value="Needs Operating System"> Needs Operating System</label><br> <label><input type="checkbox" name="problem[]" value="Needs Microsoft Office"> Needs Microsoft Office</label><br> <label><input type="checkbox" name="problem[]" value="Interested In Backup Services"> Interested In Backup Services</label><br> <label><input type="checkbox" name="problem[]" value="Wants A Custom PC Build"> Wants A Custom PC Build</label><br> In your processing foreach ($_POST['problem'] as $problem) { echo $problem . '<br>'; }
  10. 2 points
    Commencing with test_config.txt as # interface eth0 subnet 10.0.10.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 { } host cm-test1 { hardware ethernet 78:8d:f7:2b:bc:79; fixed-address 172.17.12.80; filename "srv-050.cfg"; } host cm-test2 { hardware ethernet 5c:35:3b:4d:73:4b; fixed-address 172.17.13.119; filename "srv-042.cfg"; } host cm-instrumenti { hardware ethernet 78:8d:f7:2b:bc:79; fixed-address 172.17.12.80; filename "srv-050.cfg"; } host cm-nimonmehmetaj { hardware ethernet 5c:35:3b:4d:73:4b; fixed-address 172.17.13.119; filename "srv-042.cfg"; } This is one way $unwanted = [ 'cm-instrumenti', 'cm-nimonmehmetaj' ]; // unwantedt host names $text = file_get_contents('test_config.txt'); $config = array_map('trim',explode('}', $text)); $new_config = array_filter($config, function ($v) use($unwanted) { foreach ($unwanted as $name) { if (strpos($v, $name)!==false) return false; // remove unwanted elements } return $v!=''; // remove blank entries }); file_put_contents('new_config.txt', join("\n}\n", $new_config) . "\n}\n"); giving new_config.txt as # interface eth0 subnet 10.0.10.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 { } host cm-test1 { hardware ethernet 78:8d:f7:2b:bc:79; fixed-address 172.17.12.80; filename "srv-050.cfg"; } host cm-test2 { hardware ethernet 5c:35:3b:4d:73:4b; fixed-address 172.17.13.119; filename "srv-042.cfg"; }
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